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The Photos of the Year for 2021

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tornado debris is visible from inside a movie theater

a ship called the Ever Given is stuck in the Suez Canal

terrorist storm the Capitol Building on January 6

a man dressed in an elaborate costume get a vaccine shot

a group of kids play soccer in front of a setting sun

a young child with Covid on a respirator

a school band rehearses, each in an individual airtight pod

a monkey walks though a scale model of a city

volcanic ash almost completely covers a house

citizens protesting the coup in Myanmar firing slingshots

Simone Biles flying high in the air above the vault

It is difficult to separate 2021 from the previous year — Covid, social & political unrest, and the climate crisis bind them together in my memory. I think, at the beginning of this year, many people thought it was going to be better year than the last, but instead it was 2020: The Sequel. Meaghan Looram summed the year up succinctly for the NY Times:

The year 2021 opened with the promise of vaccines, and the belief that we would all return to “normal” after the tumultuous year of the pandemic. But the year instead took off with an insurrection in the U.S. Capitol, and saw a summer of carefree gatherings derailed by a fast-spreading virus. Governments fell, democracies were challenged, and climate-related destruction was unleashed, all while the casualties of the pandemic continued to amass. The vaccine saved some lives, but human passions, hopes and fears did their usual work to create a year that was anything but calm, and is ending with the prospect of a new variant upending plans once again.

As I do every year, I went through a bunch of photos-of-the-year lists and picked up some favorites; they are embedded above. The first photo, taken by amateur photographer Shawn Triplett with his iPhone in the aftermath of the Kentucky tornados, wasn’t included in any of the lists but it was probably my favorite of the year. There’s something about the framing, the emptiness, the destruction, and the screen-mediated chaos vs. order that is the perfect metaphor for how things are feeling right now.

You can check out more of the year’s best photos here:

The photos above were taken by (from top to bottom): Shawn Triplett, satellite imagery, Shannon Stapleton, Jouni Porsanger, Siphiwe Sibeko, Callaghan O’Hare, Don Seabrook, Alexey Pavlishak, Emilio Morenatti, Anonymous, and Doug Mills.

Tags: best of   best of 2021   photography
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dmpop
28 days ago
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Fürth, Germany
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Sixty-Four Foxy Faces: Portraits of Fantastic Foxes Over 10+ Years

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A grid of 64 fox portraits by photographer Roeselien Raimond

“Don’t you have enough fox pictures yet?” That’s a question I get asked regularly. “Not by a long shot!” Those photos are just a great excuse to stalk these fantastic animals for over ten years. And no, I can’t get enough.

In fact, every day I find them a little sweeter and more beautiful.

The Smiling Fox

I remember ‘my’ first fox (photographed back in 2009) like it was yesterday; A beautiful lady who always seemed to be smiling. Enjoy could have been her middle name. The story goes that she was raised as an orphan fox by foresters. I don’t know if it’s true. I do know that I was amazed at her trust in people.

Sometimes I was sitting in a dune pan when she would surprise me with a visit. Quietly she would come and sit next to me, look at me and squeeze her eyes with satisfaction. I looked back, did the same, and for a moment the world was perfect. She taught me the art of “being in the moment.”

A portrait of a squinting fox
The Vixen. Smiling and squinting.

Flatheads and Longnoses

At the time, there were roughly two types of foxes in that area. One group looked like every part of them came rolling out of a round mold: Strikingly round ears, big round eyes, fluffy round bodies, and round faces with a short nose. These foxes I lovingly nicknamed The Flatheads.

In addition, there was a second family with an almost opposite appearance. Beautiful orange-red slender foxes with a natural elegance, long pointy ears, and large slanted eyes that gave them an almost sultry expression. Inspired by their exceptionally long noses, I called them – how could it be otherwise – The Longnoses.

Side by side comparison of fox faces
Longnose (left) and flathead (right) foxes.

The Average Fox

Although the Flatheads and Longnose were rival clans, I suspect there must have been regular love affairs, which mixed the bloodlines against all the rules. Over the years I noticed both sharp and rounded edges slowly disappear. Longnoses and Flatheaded seemed to blend into what could be characterized as an ‘average fox’.

A portrait of a fox
The ‘average fox’, a kind of archetype fox with ‘ordinary’ ears, eyes and face shape.

Facing Foxes

“How can you tell all these foxes apart?” By now I must have roughly met about 50 foxes. And yet the answer is simple: “Just like you keep 50 people apart.”

Just as you don’t usually confuse your neighbor with your uncle, the fox in the coastal area looks different from the fox in the forest. Each fox has its own face. One has chocolate eyes, the other golden yellow. Some foxes have the cutest little eyebrows or very long whiskers, beautiful eyeliner, or strikingly white cheeks. But above all, they all have different expressions.

Some foxes are boundlessly friendly. Others are just a bit grumpier. There are exceptionally clever specimens and more clumsy variants. Some foxes seem almost shy. Others have a genuine swagger. And very occasionally I suspect that foxes secretly have a sense of humor. Which could very well be my projection of course.

A portrait of a fox
Do foxes have a sense of humor? They sure know how to make a funny face.

64 Personalities

Anyway…all these totally different personalities, are reflected in their faces. And very, very occasionally a cub is born with a cute flat nose, extremely round ears, and such a fluffy round body. She looks at me, squints her eyes, I do the same and for a moment the world is perfect again.

A portrait of a fox squinting
Round ears, round face, squinting eyes…check!

Do you still think that a fox is simply a fox…? Take a deep look into those 128 beautiful eyes above and… think again!

Some Foxy Facts

Here are some facts about foxes.

Friendly Foxes

Don’t tell my beloved cats, but I think foxes might very well be the sweetest animals I have ever met. Although they can squabble amongst themselves for food or territory, I have never seen them show aggression towards people.

A portrait of a fox
Sissy

As we all know, among our own species, males are dominant. They put themselves out, blow themselves up, and like to boss around. With foxes, the so-called ‘dog foxes’ are most gentle and they wait quietly until the females have calmed down.

A portrait of a fox

Fox Specialties

Each fox has its own hunting specialty. Some are true mouse pounce masters. Others lurk among the reeds for waterfowl. Some foxes even climb trees in search of bird nests!

A portrait of a fox

Night Owls?

It is often thought that foxes are only nocturnal by nature, but we have made them so by hunting them. Foxes that are not hunted are (also) daily active, with the added advantage that we can enjoy their presence.

A portrait of a fox

Amazing Ears

Did you know that foxes can find larvae by ear? While walking they tilt their heads, ear to the left, ear to the right. Suddenly they stop…start digging frantically and… gotcha!

A portrait of a fox

Zen Foxes

Foxes fully master the art of Zen. When there is no hunting, feeding, or defending to do, then only one thing is important: Close your eyes, nose in the air, and… enjoy. Right here, right now.

A portrait of a fox

Solitary but Social

Although foxes are solitary animals and hunt alone and not in packs like wolves, they have strong family ties. Daughters stay with their mothers for one to two years, learning all the tricks of the fox trade. In return, they help mom raise the cubs by playing and hunting with the new siblings.

A portrait of a fox

Good Parenting

Foxes make great parents. Especially the mothers who continue to care for their cubs for about ten months. After that, the -now fertile- sons are, for obvious reasons, meant to learn to stand on their own feet.

A portrait of a fox

Many Flavors

Foxes’ characters may differ as much as human characters. They come in all flavors: Shy and arrogant, from wallflower to cocky, chronically happy or notoriously sad. Helpful or headstrong. Mischievous and cute. Name it and you’ll have a fox version of it.

A portrait of a fox

Cuddle Bugs

Foxes are great cuddlers. Every excuse is used for a good cuddle session. Under the guise of ‘shall I just remove a tick’, faces are mutually swabbed non-stop.

A portrait of a fox

Naughty

Although foxes are much sweeter than I could have ever imagined, they can be a little mischievous at times. Foxes bury prey for later and mark the spot by peeing over it. Also useful for lazy colleagues, who casually steal your freshly caught prey.

A portrait of a fox

Animal of Many Colors

As you can see in the pictures, foxes always have brown eyes. The coat color varies from dull salt-and-pepper to almost golden yellow, to orange-red. The color can vary slightly per year and season. And if you’re very lucky you can even find them in black (melanistic), mixed red and black (cross fox) or white (albino).

A portrait of a fox

Smiling Fox

They say foxes can’t smile. I firmly doubt that.

A portrait of a fox


About the author: Roeselien Raimond is a fox and nature photographer based in the Netherlands. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. Raimond is also a writer and editor of Natuurfotografie Magazine. You can find more of Raimond’s work on her website, Facebook, and Instagram.

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dmpop
41 days ago
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Fürth, Germany
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Wildlife Photographer Takes Incredible Photos on His Lunch Breaks

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Dave Newman's wildlife photography

Office worker by day but a passionate wildlife photographer in his spare time, Dave Newman has found himself surrounded by fans and media attention after sharing his shots of local wildlife that he has captured during his lunch breaks.

Based in Sleaford, a small market town in Lincolnshire, United Kingdom, Newman works for a building, plumbing, and heating company. As a full-time office worker, being out in nature and enjoying wildlife is something that helps Newman relax and recharge, especially during work breaks with his camera in hand.

Dave Newman's wildlife photography Dave Newman's wildlife photography Dave Newman's wildlife photography Dave Newman's wildlife photography

He says that during his lunch breaks, he often makes the short trip from his office in the center of town to a river nearby where he has been able to capture incredible photos of the local wildlife.

“For me, it’s all about not knowing what is around the corner as you walk the rivers, fields, woodlands, etc. — myself, my camera and wildlife, no bustle of people, just peace, quiet with the sounds of nature,” Newman says.

“Whether it is sunny or winter cold, I love the outside world and what it can bring. Stressful working days, wildlife gives me a 30-minute breath and recharge during my lunch breaks, it’s a blessing.”

Dave Newman's wildlife photographyDave Newman's wildlife photography Dave Newman's wildlife photography

Newman tells PetaPixel that when he was younger, he had a Nikon P900 which had great optical zoom capabilities at the time and fulfilled his fascination with photographing the Moon.

He soon figured that for wildlife it “didn’t cut the mustard” and after a few Nikon models he upgraded to a D500, which he used for two years. However, now his latest wildlife setup includes Sony A9 and Sony a7R III with Sony 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 and Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lenses, as well as the Sony 1.4x Teleconverter.

Dave Newman's wildlife photography Dave Newman's wildlife photography Dave Newman's wildlife photography

When asked about memorable experiences in his wildlife journey so far, Newman’s favorite moment is when he captured a diving kingfisher on his first attempt, pictured below. This is not an easy feat and other photographers, professionals, and amateurs alike, have spent years and numerous shots to get an image of the fast bird in action.

Dave Newman's wildlife photography

Although Newman has pursued wildlife photography for just over three years, he has already received local, national, and international attention including BBC UK, BBC Worldwide, and BBC TV features. Within 16 months of starting his social media pages to showcase his images, he has amassed a huge social following from around the world.

Dave Newman's wildlife photography

“At the moment, I am just a normal guy with a camera who loves his wildlife,” says Newman.

He has been overwhelmed with kind messages received from people who have shared that they have been inspired by him which has also given Newman a glimmer of hope to make this a full-time profession in the future.

More of Newman’s wildlife photography can be seen on his Facebook and Instagram.


Image credits: All images by Dave Newman and used with permission.

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dmpop
65 days ago
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Fürth, Germany
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Ornate Painted Patterns Conceal Photographer Cecilia Paredes Against Textile Backdrops

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“Blue Flight” (2021). All images courtesy of Ruiz-Healy Art, shared with permission

Peruvian artist Cecilia Paredes continues her ongoing series of camouflaged self-portraits with deceptive new works that leave only her hair, eyes, and ears untouched. Set against lavish backdrops printed with birds in shades of blue, floral motifs, and ornate flourishes, Paredes paints her skin and positions herself in a precise alignment with the chosen pattern, disappearing among the colorful landscapes. Each work, which the Lima-born artist refers to as “photo performances,” considers how individual identities are informed by natural environments and the broader cultural milieu. Explore an archive of Paredes’s lavish portraits at Ruiz-Healy Art and on Artsy.

 

“The Unseen Glance” (2021)

“Paradise Hands IV” (2020)

“The Whisper” (2021)

“Magnolia Stories” (2020)

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dmpop
74 days ago
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Fürth, Germany
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This free web tool is a fast and easy way to remove objects from images

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Ever needed to quickly edit something or someone out of an image?

Maybe it’s the stranger who wandered into your family photo, or the stand holding up your final artwork for school? Whatever the job, if you don’t have the time or Photoshop skills needed to edit the thing yourself, why not try Cleanup.pictures — a handy web tool that does exactly what it promises in the URL.

Just upload your picture, paint over the thing you want removed with the brush tool, and hey presto: new image. The results aren’t up to the standards of professionals, especially if the picture is particularly busy or complex, but they’re surprisingly good. The tool is also just quite fun to play around with. You can check out some examples in the gallery below:

C...

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dmpop
88 days ago
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Fürth, Germany
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Why you need a personal laptop

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The ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 9 closed, seen from above.
Yep, if my employer gave me a ThinkPad X1 Carbon, I’d want to use it all the time too. Don’t do it! | Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

It’s a decision that may seem like a no-brainer. You’ve got a new job, and they’ve just given you a brand-new ThinkPad. Perfect, you think to yourself. It’s about time I got rid of that 10-year-old MacBook Air.

I’ve been there. Surveys have shown that over half of workers use work-issued devices for personal tasks — whether sending personal messages, shopping online, accessing social media, or reading the news. The prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop — not just for work, but also for Netflixing, group chat messaging, reading fanfiction, paying bills, and emailing recipes to your mom — is understandably tempting, especially for folks who work from home. Keeping work tasks and personal tasks in one place may feel like...

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dmpop
125 days ago
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Fürth, Germany
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